Special Events
Are DMCs in Danger, Paper Still Rules at Meetings, Congress Looks at Replacing Some Meetings with Videoconferences

Are DMCs in Danger, Paper Still Rules at Meetings, Congress Looks at Replacing Some Meetings with Videoconferences

DMC expert Padraic Gilligan discusses the threat that online services present to destination management companies, a Barco study shows that paper still rules at meetings, and a bill introduced in the U.S. Congress threatens to replace some face-to-face meetings with videoconferences

Do online services threaten DMCs?
That’s what Padraic Gilligan (in photo) was left wondering after reading the Special Events’  latest “Top 25 DMCs” list, which includes data on what destination management companies view as their sector’s main trends and challenges today. Gilligan, who is vice president, Ovation Global DMC, agreed with the top three (an improving economy overall, tight lead times, flat budgets). But he notes a cloud looming over his business, and that cloud is technology—specifically, online guide sites. Our sister publications group, MeetingsNet, has the full story; click here.

Paperless meetings? Not yet, study says
Imaging products developer Barco says that 69 percent of executives still rely on hard copies of presentations in the typical meetings they attend. In fact, paper usage outpaced newer technologies by a landslide, with only 28 percent of survey respondents using a presentation device to share content, and 23 percent using a tablet. Download the study here.

Congress looks at videoconferencing to replace some meetings
U.S. Representative Michael Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.) introduced a bill in Congress that would require federal agencies to use videoconferencing in place of face-to-face meetings to reduce federal travel expenditures by up to 50 percent from 2013 levels. The bill, the Stay in Place, Cut the Waste Act of 2013 (H.R. 2463), would go into effect starting fiscal year 2017 if passed. Our sister publications group, MeetingsNet, has the full story; click here.

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