Drunken bridal party Photo by Kzenon / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Bye-bye, Bridezillas: Venues Turning Down Rowdy Bachelorette Parties

Rowdy bachelorette parties are wearing out their welcome at some special event venues.

Those wild-child bachelorette parties so popular on reality TV? Venues are starting to turn them down.

The Wall Street Journal reports that rowdy behavior from raucous bachelorette parties—amplified on social media—is prompting some event venues to say no to them:

It’s wedding season, when throngs of bachelorettes descend with entourages on hot spots from Savannah to San Francisco. Some wineries, tour operators and hotels want a divorce. Bachelorette bashes were bringing a “prom-queen tiara vibe” to Montauk Beach House on New York's Long Island, says the boutique hotel’s operations manager, Yannis Papagianni. “It’s just not what we go for.” Over-imbibing devolved into displays of drama, he says. “Half of them end up crying about something,” he says. “It came to the point where, is it a bachelorette party or a carnival?”
The establishment still allows bachelorette parties but has set new rules forbidding “veils, tiaras, crowns, balloons, inflatable objects or any other paraphernalia.”

Men’s prenuptial parties, too, can get out of hand, says Kyle Samples, sales manager at LaZoom Tours in Asheville, N.C. It forbids bachelor and bachelorette parties alike from its comedy tours, steering them instead to its “Band and Beer Tour.” Compared with the male variation, though, “it’s much easier to spot a bachelorette party,” because there tend to be veils, sashes and matching shirts, says Robbie Goldsmith, chief executive of Bach Weekend, which organizes​ pre-wedding festivities for men and women in Nashville and New Orleans.

Bachelorette parties tend to be larger than stags, says Lauren Kay, deputy editor of The Knot, a wedding-information website. And, she says, many women visit “more refined” places where families and couples go. … Wall Street Journal

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